Toronto Botanical Garden

Take a stroll through the Toronto Botanical Garden, one of Toronto's largest and most stunning parks. With 17 themed gardens featuring over 4,000 different varieties of plants and flowers, sitting on four glorious acres within the Edwards Gardens, a leisurely and colorful day can be enjoyed. Not to mention, the Toronto Botanical Garden also offers free tours (summer only), horticulture classes, an extensive horticultural library, children programs, and special events. And during your visit, you can support the non-profit Toronto Botanical Garden by purchasing a special memento from their garden shop and treat yourself to a delectable morsel at the Bloom Cafe (open seasonally).

Walking through the Toronto Botanical Garden is a journey through an oasis of green, beauty, and tranquility. Welcoming flower aromas float through the air as your eyes feast on the splendid vegetation. Though the gardens are open year round, they burst into a sea of colours in spring and summer. But any time you visit is the perfect time to visit. The gardens are always being updated to feature seasonal varieties of plants, both local and exotic. So visiting in different seasons provides a different experience.

But the Toronto Botanical Garden is more than just appreciating the superb plants and flowers. It’s the mission of the gardens to educate visitors about horticultural and tending for individual gardens. This is accomplished through a series of classes offered at the gardens, in-person tours, and audio tours. Many plants found in the garden are those that can flourish in city environments giving inspiration to those with a green thumb. And for kids, there’s the Learning Garden. Featuring a collection of vegetable gardens, it’s the perfect spot to introduce hands-on nurturing for gardens. 

For up-to-date information and details on Toronto Botanical Garden, we recommend you visit their website. For information about other places of interest to explore nearby, keep scrolling to see what Destination Ontario recommends.

Some things to do may not be available due to COVID-19.

For the most up-to-date information on where and when it is safe to travel please visit: covid-19.ontario.ca

More about Toronto Botanical Garden

Located at 777 Lawrence Avenue East in Toronto, just 16 kilometres north of downtown Toronto, the Toronto Botanical Garden is easily accessible by taking the TTC Yonge subway line, getting off at Eglinton, and transferring to a TTC bus 51, 54 or 162. Alternatively, you can drive to the gardens, but keep in mind that there is only paid parking.

The Toronto Botanical Garden is free to visit, though donations are gladly welcomed. And visitors are free to roam the grounds from dusk to dawn everyday.

Toronto Botanical Garden is a perfect fit for everyone, including families and anyone needing full accessibility (gardens and public spaces) looking to spend several hours away from the bustle of the city. And be sure to give yourself time in the gardens. You are sure to not notice time flying as you lose yourself in your surroundings. It has been attracting around 250,000 visitors annually through the manicured landscapes, classes, special events and their Edwards Summer Music Series.

But truly, it is the opulent gardens that attracts visitors. And with the wealth of variety of vegetation you can see, you will certainly want to linger at every corner of the Toronto Botanical Garden. The different themed gardens include carpet beds, a herb garden, a water channel and woodland walk. Many gardens are constantly being updated to showcase perennial favorites.

The Toronto Botanical Gardens opened their doors in 2006 but a garden has existed on the site since 1817. Purchased by Alexander Milne, he built his home and business on the extensive plot of land. The area, now known as Edwards Gardens, began to take its modern shape in 1944 when the property was purchased and revitalized by Rupert Edwards. After only 10 years, Edwards decided to sell the outdoor oasis to the Toronto Council… and the public Edwards Gardens was born.